Leadership Solutions

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Knowledge Corner - Alignment / ROI

The Knowledge Corner offers many resources to help you manage risk. Explore the topics offered in the navigation bar or if you can't find what you're looking for, use Find it For Me!™

The icons shown adjacent to the titles of these resources provide information about sources.
  • blue icon = Tools, solutions, research and publications created by Security Executive Council
  • cyan icon = Materials created by Security Executive Council strategic alliance partners
  • green icon = Other material reviewed and deemed relevant to security and risk management executives by the Security Executive Council




Tools

   

Board Level Risk Categories & Security Program Elements (v.4) This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: The Security Executive Council
The Board Level Risk diagram is a conceptual image to convey your program in the language of the board when presenting to senior management. This image is frequently used to explain how security programs align with enterprise level risk concerns. It can also be used as an awareness tool. The categories of risk areas and security strategies and mitigation efforts were developed from on research of numerous companies' risk mitigation assessments.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
    OPaL+ Assessment Executive Summary This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This assessment is based on over ten years of research and trending on successful corporate security leaders and programs. It consists of three main factors that play a role in the success of enhancing or moving programs ahead in any given organization: Organizational readiness, program maturity and leadership status.
Click to download PDF file
455KB
   

Performance Dashboard Tool This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: The Security Executive Council
This tool was developed to apprise the enterprise of Security's efforts and value in a way that resonates with the Board and/or senior management. It can also be used as a tool to gather feedback from management on how they perceive Security's performance. Program data is fed into "dashboard dial" indicators of success based on enterprise risk concerns that can be used in presentations. The zip file contains versions of the performance dashboard for both Excel 2003 and Excel 2007.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   

Security Executive Council Collective Knowledge: Comprehensive Security Program V.3 This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: The Security Executive Council
A presentation used as a benchmark security programs or to educate senior management (or new leadership) on program status or future direction. Showing senior management the security function is operating in similar fashion as other well established functions (e.g., finance or marketing) will go a long way.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only

Research & Benchmarks

   14 Effective Solutions for Creating Successful Security Programs This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This paper highlights brief case studies that depict solutions using Security Executive Council tools and processes. These are based on what the SEC has gleaned in the last 10 years working with security practitioners. At the end of the document don't miss 10 Tips You Can Learn from our Experience with Successful Programs.
 
   Advances and Stalemates in Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Managing Director and Kathleen Kotwica, Ph.D., EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist, Security Executive Council
The SEC report is the result of ongoing research and trending of security-related issues to shed light on some remarkable changes in the security industry in the last seven to ten years, many of which are driven by technology advances and shifts in the business environment.
 
   Business Journals for Risk Managers This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
A wise risk manager needs to understand the environment security programs are operating in. One of the best ways to obtain that knowledge is to keep up-to-date on the organization, industry and the economy. It's not just about the housing market and global debt, instead it's having a broad understanding of what the organization is facing in terms of its customers, employees, suppliers, and competitors. Keeping an eye on what is important to your executive team will help you when it comes to communicating risk to management.
 
   Corporate Security Organizational Structure, Cost of Services and Staffing Benchmark This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: The Security Leadership Research Institute
The Security Leadership Research Institute (SLRI) has published ground breaking results of their Corporate Security Organizational Structure, Cost of Services and Staffing survey. The full report covers such metrics as security budgets, staffing, program drivers, governance and oversight. This executive summary provides a glimpse into some of what is contained in the full report. If you participate in the SLRI surveys you can receive the next edition of the full report. For more information about SLRI click here
TIER 1 LEADERS: Log-in to obtain your copy.
OTHER VISITORS: Click the title to order this SEC resource.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Corporate Security Organizational Structure, Cost of Services and Staffing Benchmark: Selected Highlights This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council Staff
The latest research on the staffing structure and costs of services for corporate security has been published by the Security Leadership Research Institute. The data used in this analysis were provided from Security Leadership Research Institute (SLRI) members and Tier 1 Leaders™ of the Security Executive Council.
 
   Defending Your Budget This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
The Security Executive Council has documented the three common responses that executives typically employ to address the issue of being better prepared and more strategic when their existing budget is challenged or when across-the-board cuts are ordered.
 
   Demonstrating the Value Security Brings to the Organization This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
One of the things that separates the leaders in security from the rest is the ability to define and communicate the return their security programs provide to the organization. Here are some ideas you can use to identify the business value returned by your security programs.
 
   Driving Excellence in Enterprise Security  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
This paper provides a starting place for security leaders who are interested in operational excellence or are considering applying it within their programs. It includes: Range of approaches gathered from discussions with a number of Tier 1 Leaders™; insight into how to achieve a critical baseline assessment of security’s value; potential measures of excellence in security programs; and a template to help investigate and identify initial targets for application of operational excellence.
 
   Improving the Way Risk Management is Perceived by the Enterprise This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
Survey respondents were encouraged to share what they have done to help improve the perception of security and risk management programs in the eyes of their enterprise.
 
   Security Barometer Results: Security's Biggest Challenge This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
The role of the Security function is essentially identifying and mitigating security risks to the organization. While difficult enough that is arguably not the biggest challenge Security is confronted with. In this Security Barometer we wanted to investigate the hurdles that Security must overcome within their organizations to accomplish their goals.
 
   Security Barometer Results: Top 5 Security Risks To Your Organization This is Security Executive Council material  
As organizations become leaner and more agile the management of security risks becomes more important than ever in protecting the value being built. It is becoming imperative that all business functions maintain focus on the tasks that really matter to the organization. See what risk management executives are focusing on now.
 
   

Security Budget Research Report This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: The Security Executive Council
This is an analysis of data collected from survey of security program budgets that was conducted by the Council January 2009. This report, available to Council members, provides detailed information on the changes in budgets over the past two fiscal years segmented by industry as well as budget category. In addition the report provides a list of some of the creative efforts that security executives are undertaking to counter the effects the economy is having on their security programs.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   The Effect Organizational Culture has on Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
In this security barometer we examining whether the organization you work for is hindering or helping you achieve your risk management objectives.
 
   The Importance of Security's Brand Image This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
Some people think that security is doing their ultimate job when their peers within the organization do not know that security is there. There is a certain logic to this. If there is no cyber breach, if there is no incident of violence, if material has not been stolen from the grounds then we must be doing a good job and if we are doing a good job people will notice. Right? Wrong.
 
   The Roadmap for Security Leadership Success This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This thought leader paper and series of podcasts is the result of ten years worth of working with security practitioners. Our research identified 10 common practices that highly accomplished security leaders exhibit. Also, listen to SEC subject matter experts provide their thoughts on executing the 10 practices.
 
   What is the Item Most Often Missed in Risk Management Planning? This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
When analyzing risks to your organization there is one that often goes overlooked and that is a change in management. A new leader will have his or her own agenda, goals, and view of what security does and what security’s role should be. Here are some things that you need to know when you are facing a change in leadership.
 
   What is the Most Important Concept You Need to Communicate to Management? This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This Security Barometer takes a look at one part of telling security's story. In particular this poll focused on what practitioners are communicating to management and the outcome of those discussions.
 
   Why Focus on Business Reputation Risk? This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
In a recent Security Executive Council (SEC) Security Barometer poll we found the one thing that security practitioners felt would most help their department and career is to become more involved with the business side of the organization. To achieve that goal successful risk managers must demonstrate a thorough understanding of what is important to senior executives.
 
   Why You Should Conduct Confidence Surveys This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
The Security Executive Council (SEC) has conducted extensive research and analyzed what makes programs successful. Based on this work there is a particular kind of survey the SEC has been recommending recently, what we call confidence surveys, which are used to assess the level of confidence the organization has in your programs and services. One of the things our research has shown is that leaders of successful security risk mitigation programs know how familiar internal customers are with their services and how they feel about them.
 

Presentation Materials

   Aligning Security Services with Business Objectives, 1st Edition This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Richard Lefler, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
Aligning Security Services with Business Objectives presents the ways in which security practitioners and executives can convey the value of security services to business leaders using measures and metrics. This 42-minute proven practices presentation also addresses how to develop and manage security programs that enhance profitability and the company’s ability to reduce shrinkage and loss.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Proven Practice presentations were created to be guidelines or training tools. This version is an Adobe file but you may contact us at contact@secleader.com for an online version with audio included from the subject matter expert.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Aligning Security Services with Business Objectives: The Security Director’s Template  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Richard A. Lefler, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
This comprehensive slide presentation was developed to immediately utilize within your company in order to be more successful and provide a higher level of security leadership to the corporation. This presentation was created by a former CSO to use when promoting Security's value to senior management. The main objective of such a presentation is to demonstrate how Security's strategy and services support business goals. Coaching notes are provided in PowerPoint "View > Notes."
A Tier 1 Leader item available for purchase. Visit our store.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Building Your Program This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
Demonstrating to senior management that you have a vision for what needs to be done, why and with what resources is an essential first step in gaining their confidence and buy-in for your plans. This diagram is a representation of the steps in the business case assessment and building process. It is an example of the many proven strategic initiatives included in the book, Adding Business Value by Managing Security Risks, from the Security Executive Council.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Defining the Value of Security's Accomplishments This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
Arguably the most common challenge among security leaders is being able to communicate the value risk management services and programs bring to the organization. The Security Executive Council has put together this short slide deck highlighting three elements that you can be helpful toward defining what you add to the bottom line.
 
   Discovering the Total Cost of Security to the Enterprise This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Richard Lefler, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
In Discovering the Total Cost of Security to the Enterprise, presenter Richard Lefler discusses what security actually costs an organization in terms of operating, variable, and mandatory costs. Each of the three types of security costs are defined and expanded upon in this presentation. Lefler also explains how certain industry sectors have increasing variable and operating costs, along with the reasons behind these trends. The presentation also covers mandatory spend versus discretionary spend, chief security officer management (CSO) trends, and the critical next steps for CSOs.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Proven Practice presentations were created to be guidelines or training tools. This version is an Adobe file but you may contact us at contact@secleader.com for an online version with audio included from the subject matter expert.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   

Enterprise / Security Alignment Review This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: The Security Executive Council
The Security Executive Council recognized that the security industry has no commonly accepted standards by which to build and judge success in managing security programs. This program pairs security or other executive clients with former security executives who have found success in managing risk in corporations. These reviews are specifically tailored to meet the needs of each client and/or company. This program is also used to help security executives understand the relationship between the company’s strategic business objectives and its security programs.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
   Insight into Security Leader Success - Part 1 This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This presentation is food for thought if you want to create a business-based security department that provides value, and is valued by your enterprise. These insights were collected from over 10 years of assisting security leaders to move their programs to the next level.
 
   Insight into Security Leader Success - Part 2 This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This concise guide contains Indispensable insights collected from over 10 years of assisting security leaders presented here in a quick and easy to review format. Apply this knowledge to create a business aligned security department that provides value and is valued by the enterprise.
 
   

Security Scorecard This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: The Security Executive Council
This is a take on the business scorecard but from the Security Organization perspective: How the Security Organization adds value to the business.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Smart Security: Practices that Increase Business Profits This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: J. David Quilter, Security Executive Council Faculty
Smart Security: Practices that Increase Business Profits offers proven concepts and practices for those seeking new and creative ways to understand and shape security that are tailored to the needs of their business or organization. In this 58-minute Proven Practices presentation, presenter J. David Quilter discusses how a fully integrated security program increases business profits while delivering smart security practices at the same time.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Proven Practice presentations were created to be guidelines or training tools. This version is an Adobe file but you may contact us at contact@secleader.com for an online version with audio included from the subject matter expert.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Smart Security: Understanding and Contributing to the Business This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: J. David Quilter, Security Executive Council Faculty
In Smart Security: Understanding and Contributing to the Business, presenter J. David Quilter demonstrates the benefits of how a fully integrated security program increases business profits and delivers smart security practices at the same time. The presentation does away with the misconception that security is only an expense. In fact, a well-integrated security program can protect business interests, thereby enhancing productivity and net income. Quilter covers cost analysis and security measures and metrics, along with how to demonstrate return on investment and leverage executive leadership. The practices and tools discussed in this presentation will reduce business losses and help improve security and operations.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Proven Practice presentations were created to be guidelines or training tools. This version is an Adobe file but you may contact us at contact@secleader.com for an online version with audio included from the subject matter expert.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   

The Strategic Landscape  This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
Is your program capable of being modified effectively when sudden changes in the economy, business direction or risks occur? Or is your strategy to provide the same services or programs regardless of changes in the strategic landscape? Results of SEC research show the best run programs are designed to respond and change quickly, in order to keep security services and associated costs aligned to the greatest degree possible. This presentation contains infographics that can be used to show how your program remains in alignment, despite sudden changes, to stakeholders.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   

Unified Risk Oversight Strategy This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
You can't determine the sources of risk or which risks to mitigate, transfer, avoid or accept unless you have a clear, enterprise-wide view of the risks that are present. The Security Executive Council calls this concept Unified Risk Oversight. This presentation contains a series of infographics that can be used to show the value of an enterprise-wide Unified Risk Oversight strategy to stakeholders. It also includes security's contribution and unavoidable residual risk concept.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
    Using Business Research to Increase the Effectiveness of Security Leadership This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Kathleen Kotwica, Ph.D., EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist, Security Executive Council
This presentation is about understanding the nuances of your constituencies and stakeholders, the benefits and limitations of benchmarking and how to align security programs with corporate culture and leadership style.
Click to download PDF file
2MB

Books/Guidelines/Manuals

   Not a Moment to Lose…Influencing Global Security One Community at a Time This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Francis D’Addario, Security Executive Council CSO Emeritus
This book was developed as an influencing tool. It is also a timely call to action following the “reversal of fortune” witnessed by the last decade of manmade and natural disaster mitigation shortfalls. This is a resource that enables risk mitigation professionals and their team to connect their mission to the values of family, community, and organization. It is a people-centric guide based on the author's experiences in locally relevant, all-hazards risk preparedness, board-level risk mitigation and return on investment. TIER 1 LEADERS: To obtain your complimentary copy send an e-mail to contact@secleader.com.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
   Unified Risk Oversight for Security Operational Excellence This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
Senior management appears to waking up to the fact that non-financial risk is just as important to attend to as financial risk. Of course, most security leaders know this already – but the issue has been getting management to pay attention. This guide proposes a way to play a more visible role in enterprise risk management by way of operational risk management.
 

Articles

    2011 Annual Report for the Security Executive Council  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This year's report covers activities, initiatives and resources in a three page condensed document. The information may be used to learn the kinds of support the SEC can offer you as well as a glimpse into what its members are tackling.
Click to download PDF file
745KB
    A Seamless Alliance  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Chad Deaton, CEO of Baker Hughes Inc. and Russ Cancilla, Baker Hughes vice president of security and health, safety and environment, discuss the elements necessary to creating a successful working relationship between a CEO and CSO.
Click to download PDF file
247KB
   Business Evolution Requires Active Security Alignment This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council Staff
Business continues to change, and if the next generation of security leaders hopes to succeed, they must be prepared to change with it, says Dick Lefler, former VP & CSO of American Express and current Chairman and Dean of Emeritus Faculty for the Security Executive Council. This will require, among other things, a much more active pursuit of alignment with the organization’s structure, goals and strategies.
 
    Characteristics of a Good Relationship Between Corporate Security and Information Security  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council Staff
Security professionals offer ways of strengthening the lines of communication to improve overall security.
Click to download PDF file
176KB
   Contract Security Challenges and Strategies: Part I and Part II This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Heather O'Brien, Security Executive Council Content Expert Faculty
Part I covers best practices for security services (guard force) contracts and Part II speaks to finding the right KPIs to demonstrate the value of contracted security services.
 
   Coping with Changes to Company Leadership This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Security Executive Council Managing Director, and Greg Kane, Director of IT and Product Technology
Though we deal with risk every day, there is one risk that rarely makes it into our risk management plans – a change in organizational leadership. Whether the result of an internal structural shift, an external hiring decision or a merger/acquisition, a change in leadership and reporting can signal a challenging time for security. The new leader will have his or her own agenda, goals and view of what security does and what security’s role should be. If this does not mesh with your view or your existing strategies and operations, some meeting of the minds will be necessary.
 
    Lean Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Ray Bernard, Security Executive Council Subject Matter Expert Faculty; Lynn Mattice; Derrick Wright, Security Executive Council Tier 1 Leader
Lean principles contain perspectives and tools that can be of tremendous use in increasing the value that security managers and executives provide to their organizations.
Click to download PDF file
337KB
   Managing Enterprise-Wide Board Risk  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
A briefing on the Council's Board Level Risk Categories & Security Program Elements research and concept graphic. This type of information can be used to show senior management how security fits into the organization's overall risk management program.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
    Managing Expectations in a Changing World This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Problem identified and communicated, plan created, funds provided, problem resolved. This is the lifecycle senior business leaders often expect – and prefer – organizational challenges to have. It’s the way decisions are made and issues addressed for many functions of the business. Unfortunately, this leads senior management to expect a similar lifecycle of security-related challenges: 1) Security apprises management of threats and vulnerabilities. 2) Management allocates funds to address them. 3) Problem solved.
Click to download PDF file
691KB
    Measuring the Business Value of Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Geoff Kohl
The Security Executive Council weighs in on why security metrics are important to your job.
Click to download PDF file
328KB
    Metrics for Success: Demonstrate Security's Alignment with Business Objectives This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
It's important to identify products, services and positive results that the security organization brings to help meet the enterprise’s business goals.
Click to download PDF file
155KB
   Metrics for Success: Is Your Security Program Viewed as Effective? Warning Signs of Security's Decreasing Influence This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Security Executive Council Faculty
This article examines signs that security is losing influence with management decision-makers.
 
    Metrics for Success: What is the Return on Your Company’s Security Investment?  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Security Executive Council Faculty
Having a solid grasp on the likelihood and financial implications of risk directly feeds your ability to gauge the level of protection you should provide. What’s the tradeoff between the cost of protection and the likely consequence of a variety of security incidents?
Click to download PDF file
152KB
    Ram Charan: The Business of Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Sarah Scalet
Lynn Mattice quizzes the man Fortune magazine calls "the most influential business consultant alive" about how security executives can better serve the business.
Click to download PDF file
3MB
   Rebuilding Influence after Corporate Restructuring This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Managing Director and Kathleen Kotwica, Ph.D., EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist, Security Executive Council
Company reorganizations are a fact of business that may have grown more frequent as our economy has changed in recent years. If you will be reporting to a new boss, there are several questions you should ask yourself. This article provides insight into some of those questions.
 
    Security and IT Alignment This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Ray Bernard, Security Executive Council Subject Matter Expert
IT policies and practices are not just “rules to follow” or “hoops to jump through” — phrasing it this way conceals an important point: the IT policies and practices are what company management has approved and mandated for security and cost-effectiveness reasons. This question and answer article is about applying the IT policies to your physical security technology means improving how you do things for your department and your overall organization’s benefit.
Click to download PDF file
334KB
   Security's Role in Corporate Social Responsibility This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Greg Kane, Director, IT and Product Technology, Security Executive Council
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs should consist of business-driven strategies that also support social benefits. This article discusses security's role and how to get your CSR program started.
 
   Strategic Planning: Program Life Cycle This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
An abbreviated portion of the Security Executive Council's (SEC) strategic planning process. It lists the steps to take to build your corporate security strategic plan.
 
    Successful Organizational Leadership Expert Advice from the Security Executive Council This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Most corporate senior management teams expect their security leaders to be able to easily fill in their company's objective. Many also expect their CSO or equivalent to take it a big step further by linking every one of the company’s security-related initiatives with that objective. Even CEOs who have shown little direct interest in security are starting to follow this trend. It’s all part of business’ evolving understanding of what security leadership is and who should be practicing it.
Click to download PDF file
1019KB
    There's Value in Integrated Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
SEC member Mike Howard describes how Microsoft integrated and upgraded its three Global Security Operations Centers with built-in interoperability and redundancy.
Click to download PDF file
321KB
    Using Test Sites to Decrease Incidents and Increase Buy-in This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
One of the many difficult tasks in security leadership is showing senior management and other business leaders exactly how, where, and how much security investments positively impact the bottom line (assuming, that is, that security’s impact is positive).
Click to download PDF file
627KB
   What Will Security Look Like in 2020?  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Francis D'Addario, Emeritus Faculty; Bob Hayes, Managing Director and Kathleen Kotwica, Ph.D., EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist, Security Executive Council
By the year 2020, what should “security” look like? Organizations are now more complex than ever before, and there is no evidence that the next eight years will reverse this trend. Companies have adapted to succeed in a global and decentralized market economy, increasing reliance on vendors, suppliers and contract staff for previously in-house operations. They have changed their internal structure to better compete in changing markets and a down economy, and they have learned to leverage new technologies to increase the speed of both communication and business.
 
   “Garbage In” Can Cost You Your Job  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes and Kathleen Kotwica, Security Executive Council Staff
Security practitioners and executives today have few options for collecting or accessing accurate, usable information. Currently there are four categories of information out there for security practitioners to draw from. In order of validity and rigor, they are: personal opinion, ad hoc benchmarking, selective and vetted benchmarking, and research.
 

Forums

   Faculty Advisor: Aligning Your Awareness Program With Business Goals This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Randy Uzzell, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
How can I determine which risks to build my security program around and how do I decide which awareness initiatives provide the greatest value? How do I test the effectiveness of these initiatives and get management’s buy-in? Read SEC Faculty member Randy Uzzell's answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Building a Successful Security Business Team This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: J. David Quilter, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
Q. I feel that our security department is generally thought of in a positive light in our company. However, I don’t think our business partners look at us as leaders within the company. Any advice how to turn this around? See how David Quilter responds to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Communicating Risk Avoidance to Management This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Security Executive Council Leadership Faculty
How can I maintain management’s attention to the risk that hasn’t happened yet without becoming the "Chicken Little" of the corporate governance team? Read Security Executive Council Leadership Faculty member, George Campbell's, answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Communicating the Value of Security to Management This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Nick Proctor, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
I'm fairly comfortable that the security function is aligned with our business strategies. However, I'm not convinced that many on the company's management team fully understand the value we deliver. Any suggestions on how best to accomplish this? Read SEC Emeritus Faculty member, Nick Proctor's, answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Corporate Security Strategic Planning  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Walter Clements, Associate Director, Global Security, Procter & Gamble
My company has a strategic plan process that lasts about two weeks every other year. However, it doesn’t translate to developing a real useable plan for corporate security. Do you have any ideas on creating one that does not involve a huge extra amount of time? Read Walter Clements' response to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Demonstrating Security is Not Just an Expense This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: J. David Quilter, Security Executive Council Faculty
Security is usually considered a cost-center. But some of the things we do prevent unacceptable risks from occurring, which technically is saving money. Is there any thing we can do to demonstrate how we add to the bottom line?

See how Emeritus Faculty member, David Quilter, answers this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Getting Beyond Guards and Gates  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Ken Kasten, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
My security team and I have so much to offer our company, but I can’t seem to get my management to give me the opportunity to show what we can bring to the table. Any ideas or advice on how to advance my security program beyond “guards and gates?” Read SEC Emeritus Faculty, Ken Kasten's, response to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Getting Traction for the Security Program Within the Organization This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Managing Director, Security Executive Council
What do you consider to be some key components in developing a successful security program and, specifically, how should the role align with the organization? Read SEC Managing Director, Bob Hayes', response to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Going Above and Beyond This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Managing Director and Kathleen Kotwica, Ph.D., EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist and Liz Lancaster-Brisson, Tier 1 Leader Services & Projects, Security Executive Council
Our security department is a well-oiled wheel. We have our processes in place, a knowledgeable and diverse team and get the job done. All well and good, but what I’d like is your advice to get to the “next level.” See how SEC staff members respond to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Helping Management Understand the Value of Your Security Organization This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Richard Lefler, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
I have been in charge of security for only a few years after leaving government and have no idea how to proceed in developing and presenting a plan to management. What are some of the specific areas that I should highlight to emphasize the importance of security’s role?
 
   Faculty Advisor: Improving the Security Culture Within Your Organization This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Peter Cheviot, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty Member
As a Manager of Security I am finding it difficult to influence others in my organization to participate or support the security programs. Are there effective processes that can be taken to change this? Read SEC faculty member Peter Cheviot's answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Making the Case for Capital Funding This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Kenneth Kasten, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
I need to obtain a large sum of funding for a security capital project. What advice can you offer to help improve my case when submitting the request? See Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty member, Kenneth Kasten's, answer.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Reestablishing Security as a Critical Partner within the Organization  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Security Executive Council Managing Director and Kathleen Kotwica, EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist, Security Executive Council
I have been on the job for several years and I sense senior management is not as on board with security as when I started. For example, there was management reorganization and I report to someone who is at a lower level than who I was reporting to before. There have been committees formed that I thought I should sit on and I was not invited. Should I be worried? Read Bob Hayes and Kathleen Kotwica's answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Security’s Success is About the Business  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: J. David Quilter, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
In today’s down-sized, right-sized and outsourced business operations, I understand as the security director that true business acumen is very important to success as a security leader. How can I make the security department better known to the rest of the organization? Read SEC Emeritus Faculty member, David Quilter's answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Stalemates in Security  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Kathleen Kotwica, Ph.D., EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist and Bob Hayes, Managing Director, Security Executive Council
Security has made strides in the last ten years or so but I don’t think we are valued as much as we should be by the rest of the organization. What do you think we still need to do? Read Kathleen Kotwica and Bob Hayes' response to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: The CSO as a Business Leader This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Kathleen Kotwica, Ph.D., EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist, Security Executive Council
Can you provide me some keys to demonstrate that the CSO is (needs to be) a business leader? Read Kathleen Kotwica's, answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: The Need for Effectively Telling Security's Story This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Liz Lancaster-Brisson, Director of Tier 1 Leader Services & Projects, Security Executive Council
I’ve been in the top security position for three months. I’m the first security director for the company and about to start communicating security responsibilities to the organization. What is the best message I should be putting out? Read how Liz Lancaster-Brisson responds to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Thinking Strategically to Enhance Security-Business Alignment This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Dick Lefler, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
Business leaders think in terms of growth, reduction of operating costs, margins and competition, for example. Traditionally, security leaders tend to not think in these terms. Is there a way we can present our programs to match what are the driving forces of the business side? Read DickLefler's response to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Training and Awareness Initiatives During Budget Reductions This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Joseph C, Nelson, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
With massive budget reductions and travel restrictions, can you give me some pointers on how I might continue to implement training and awareness initiatives?
 
   Faculty Advisor: Who Should Security Executives Report To? This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: The Security Executive Council
Various companies approach the considerations in hiring a Chief Security Officer differently. This blog depicts a fictitious scenario where top management is considering upgrading their security program. It then asks the reader for feedback after reviewing the conversation.
 
   Security State of the Industry - Executive Influence: Driving Results by Communicating Your Value Story - February 2016 This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This session of the SEC's Security State of the Industry briefing on executive influence covered communicating your value story and what it takes to present a successful business case. These meetings are for SEC's Tier 1 Security Leaders only.
 

Multimedia

   Briefing Your C-Level Executive This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Theresa Payton, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
This presentation will aid you in building the business case for security and risk investments. The framework reviewed in this presentation has been used at private and public sector organizations. It has successfully helped organizations articulate their value, tie their improvements to real change, and make the business case for the same or increased level of funding. TIER 1 LEADERS: To obtain your discounted copy send an e-mail to contact@secleader.com.
 
   How to Align Your Security Program to Business Strategy This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Theresa Payton, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
This will be very beneficial for CISOs and CIOs that are in the process of implementing or evaluating their security and risk strategic roadmap and communicating the need for continued investment. It will assist them in building the business case for security and risk investments – people, process and technology. The framework reviewed in this presentation has been used at private and public sector organizations and has successfully helped organizations articulate their value, tie their improvements to real change, and make the business case for the same or increased level of funding. TIER 1 LEADERS: To obtain your discounted copy send an e-mail to contact@secleader.com.
 
   Return on Investment in a Supply Chain Regulatory Compliance  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Peter Cheviot, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty Member
Regulatory and internal supply chain security compliance should be measured and results need to be connected to cost improvement, productivity gains, and revenue growth. Reporting positive results to senior management and your internal user community will influence re-investment opportunity for your security program. It will drive the essentiality and connection security has with finance, operations, and sales. TIER 1 LEADERS: To obtain your discounted copy send an e-mail to contact@secleader.com.
 
   Securing the Future: Change Management This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Nick Proctor, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty Member
TIER 1 LEADERS: To obtain your discounted copy send an e-mail to contact@secleader.com.
 
   Stop “Selling” Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Ray Bernard, Security Executive Council Subject Matter Expert Faculty
Learn how leading security practitioners have opened management’s eyes to management’s proper role in security risk decision making. Business assets are corporate assets, not security’s assets. Thus in truth management owns business risk, but can’t really own security risk unless properly informed and enabled by security. TIER 1 LEADERS: To obtain your discounted copy send an e-mail to contact@secleader.com.