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Knowledge Corner - Alignment / ROI

The Knowledge Corner offers many resources to help you manage risk. Explore the topics offered in the navigation bar or if you can't find what you're looking for, use Find it For Me!™

The icons shown adjacent to the titles of these resources provide information about sources.
  • blue icon = Tools, solutions, research and publications created by Security Executive Council
  • cyan icon = Materials created by Security Executive Council strategic alliance partners
  • green icon = Other material reviewed and deemed relevant to security and risk management executives by the Security Executive Council




Articles

    2011 Annual Report for the Security Executive Council  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This year's report covers activities, initiatives and resources in a three page condensed document. The information may be used to learn the kinds of support the SEC can offer you as well as a glimpse into what its members are tackling.
Click to download PDF file
745KB
    A Seamless Alliance  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Chad Deaton, CEO of Baker Hughes Inc. and Russ Cancilla, Baker Hughes vice president of security and health, safety and environment, discuss the elements necessary to creating a successful working relationship between a CEO and CSO.
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247KB
   Business Evolution Requires Active Security Alignment This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council Staff
Business continues to change, and if the next generation of security leaders hopes to succeed, they must be prepared to change with it, says Dick Lefler, former VP & CSO of American Express and current Chairman and Dean of Emeritus Faculty for the Security Executive Council. This will require, among other things, a much more active pursuit of alignment with the organization’s structure, goals and strategies.
 
    Characteristics of a Good Relationship Between Corporate Security and Information Security  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council Staff
Security professionals offer ways of strengthening the lines of communication to improve overall security.
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176KB
   Contract Security Challenges and Strategies: Part I and Part II This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Heather O'Brien, Security Executive Council Content Expert Faculty
Part I covers best practices for security services (guard force) contracts and Part II speaks to finding the right KPIs to demonstrate the value of contracted security services.
 
   Coping with Changes to Company Leadership This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Security Executive Council Managing Director, and Greg Kane, Director of IT and Product Technology
Though we deal with risk every day, there is one risk that rarely makes it into our risk management plans – a change in organizational leadership. Whether the result of an internal structural shift, an external hiring decision or a merger/acquisition, a change in leadership and reporting can signal a challenging time for security. The new leader will have his or her own agenda, goals and view of what security does and what security’s role should be. If this does not mesh with your view or your existing strategies and operations, some meeting of the minds will be necessary.
 
    Lean Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Ray Bernard, Security Executive Council Subject Matter Expert Faculty; Lynn Mattice; Derrick Wright, Security Executive Council Tier 1 Leader
Lean principles contain perspectives and tools that can be of tremendous use in increasing the value that security managers and executives provide to their organizations.
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337KB
   Managing Enterprise-Wide Board Risk  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
A briefing on the Council's Board Level Risk Categories & Security Program Elements research and concept graphic. This type of information can be used to show senior management how security fits into the organization's overall risk management program.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
    Managing Expectations in a Changing World This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Problem identified and communicated, plan created, funds provided, problem resolved. This is the lifecycle senior business leaders often expect – and prefer – organizational challenges to have. It’s the way decisions are made and issues addressed for many functions of the business. Unfortunately, this leads senior management to expect a similar lifecycle of security-related challenges: 1) Security apprises management of threats and vulnerabilities. 2) Management allocates funds to address them. 3) Problem solved.
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691KB
    Measuring the Business Value of Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Geoff Kohl
The Security Executive Council weighs in on why security metrics are important to your job.
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328KB
    Metrics for Success: Demonstrate Security's Alignment with Business Objectives This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
It's important to identify products, services and positive results that the security organization brings to help meet the enterprise’s business goals.
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155KB
   Metrics for Success: Is Your Security Program Viewed as Effective? Warning Signs of Security's Decreasing Influence This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Security Executive Council Faculty
This article examines signs that security is losing influence with management decision-makers.
 
    Metrics for Success: What is the Return on Your Company’s Security Investment?  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Security Executive Council Faculty
Having a solid grasp on the likelihood and financial implications of risk directly feeds your ability to gauge the level of protection you should provide. What’s the tradeoff between the cost of protection and the likely consequence of a variety of security incidents?
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152KB
    Ram Charan: The Business of Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Sarah Scalet
Lynn Mattice quizzes the man Fortune magazine calls "the most influential business consultant alive" about how security executives can better serve the business.
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3MB
   Rebuilding Influence after Corporate Restructuring This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Managing Director and Kathleen Kotwica, Ph.D., EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist, Security Executive Council
Company reorganizations are a fact of business that may have grown more frequent as our economy has changed in recent years. If you will be reporting to a new boss, there are several questions you should ask yourself. This article provides insight into some of those questions.
 
    Security and IT Alignment This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Ray Bernard, Security Executive Council Subject Matter Expert
IT policies and practices are not just “rules to follow” or “hoops to jump through” — phrasing it this way conceals an important point: the IT policies and practices are what company management has approved and mandated for security and cost-effectiveness reasons. This question and answer article is about applying the IT policies to your physical security technology means improving how you do things for your department and your overall organization’s benefit.
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334KB
   Security's Role in Corporate Social Responsibility This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Greg Kane, Director, IT and Product Technology, Security Executive Council
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs should consist of business-driven strategies that also support social benefits. This article discusses security's role and how to get your CSR program started.
 
   Strategic Planning: Program Life Cycle This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
An abbreviated portion of the Security Executive Council's (SEC) strategic planning process. It lists the steps to take to build your corporate security strategic plan.
 
    Successful Organizational Leadership Expert Advice from the Security Executive Council This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Most corporate senior management teams expect their security leaders to be able to easily fill in their company's objective. Many also expect their CSO or equivalent to take it a big step further by linking every one of the company’s security-related initiatives with that objective. Even CEOs who have shown little direct interest in security are starting to follow this trend. It’s all part of business’ evolving understanding of what security leadership is and who should be practicing it.
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1019KB
    There's Value in Integrated Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
SEC member Mike Howard describes how Microsoft integrated and upgraded its three Global Security Operations Centers with built-in interoperability and redundancy.
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321KB
    Using Test Sites to Decrease Incidents and Increase Buy-in This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
One of the many difficult tasks in security leadership is showing senior management and other business leaders exactly how, where, and how much security investments positively impact the bottom line (assuming, that is, that security’s impact is positive).
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627KB
   What Will Security Look Like in 2020?  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Francis D'Addario, Emeritus Faculty; Bob Hayes, Managing Director and Kathleen Kotwica, Ph.D., EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist, Security Executive Council
By the year 2020, what should “security” look like? Organizations are now more complex than ever before, and there is no evidence that the next eight years will reverse this trend. Companies have adapted to succeed in a global and decentralized market economy, increasing reliance on vendors, suppliers and contract staff for previously in-house operations. They have changed their internal structure to better compete in changing markets and a down economy, and they have learned to leverage new technologies to increase the speed of both communication and business.
 
   â€śGarbage In” Can Cost You Your Job  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes and Kathleen Kotwica, Security Executive Council Staff
Security practitioners and executives today have few options for collecting or accessing accurate, usable information. Currently there are four categories of information out there for security practitioners to draw from. In order of validity and rigor, they are: personal opinion, ad hoc benchmarking, selective and vetted benchmarking, and research.