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Knowledge Corner - Strategy

The Knowledge Corner offers many resources to help you manage risk. Explore the topics offered in the navigation bar or if you can't find what you're looking for, use Find it For Me!™

The icons shown adjacent to the titles of these resources provide information about sources.
  • blue icon = Tools, solutions, research and publications created by Security Executive Council
  • cyan icon = Materials created by Security Executive Council strategic alliance partners
  • green icon = Other material reviewed and deemed relevant to security and risk management executives by the Security Executive Council




Tools

   

Collective Knowledge: Security Goals, Plans, Priorities and Projects V.2  This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
This is the second presentation of Security Executive Council Tier 1 Leaders' and Security Leadership Research Institute members' shared security goals, objectives and strategic plans. The purpose of V.2 is to provide some insight into what SEC peers are working on and presenting to senior leadership; including lists of priorities and projects, which are unique to V.2. Each of the contributed goals is identified by industry sector.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
    OPaL+ Assessment Executive Summary This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This assessment is based on over ten years of research and trending on successful corporate security leaders and programs. It consists of three main factors that play a role in the success of enhancing or moving programs ahead in any given organization: Organizational readiness, program maturity and leadership status.
Click to download PDF file
455KB
   

Security Executive Council Collective Knowledge: Security Goals, Objectives and Strategic Plans V.1
Council Tier 1 Leader contributed documents  This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
This is the first of a series of projects related to Security Executive Council (SEC) Tier 1 Leaders' goals, objectives and strategic plans from security leaders that shared their documents. These samples have been genericized and are provided in the format that they were delivered to the SEC. The purpose of V.1 is to provide some insight into what SEC peers are working on now and future forward. It also provides a first time view of how nineteen different companies define and submit security goals as part of the corporate process.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   

Strategic Plan Template This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
The purpose of this plan is to communicate the strategic process used to develop a company security program. The program is meant to identify security risks that impact the company and prescribes security controls to reduce or eliminate these risks.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only

Research & Benchmarks

   14 Effective Solutions for Creating Successful Security Programs This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This paper highlights brief case studies that depict solutions using Security Executive Council tools and processes. These are based on what the SEC has gleaned in the last 10 years working with security practitioners. At the end of the document don't miss 10 Tips You Can Learn from our Experience with Successful Programs.
 
   Assessment Quiz: Organizational Readiness for Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: By: Security Executive Council
The Council has spent years researching this topic and has found that understanding what management thinks Security "is" and "does" is critical. You need to know how management perceives Security in order to educate them on the reality - and to get appropriate buy-in for resource requests or advancement of your goals.
 
   Corporate Security Organizational Structure, Cost of Services and Staffing Benchmark This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: The Security Leadership Research Institute
The Security Leadership Research Institute (SLRI) has published ground breaking results of their Corporate Security Organizational Structure, Cost of Services and Staffing survey. The full report covers such metrics as security budgets, staffing, program drivers, governance and oversight. This executive summary provides a glimpse into some of what is contained in the full report. If you participate in the SLRI surveys you can receive the next edition of the full report. For more information about SLRI click here
TIER 1 LEADERS: Log-in to obtain your copy.
OTHER VISITORS: Click the title to order this SEC resource.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
    Defining Best Practices in Global Security Operations Centers This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Documented by George Campbell, SEC Emeritus Faculty and co-lead GSOC Best Practices Working Group
The Security Executive Council Global formed the Global Security Operations Center (GSOC) working group with the objective of advancing the value proposition of security operations centers and identifying a body of best practices with group members. The group has additionally recognized that by incorporating the analytical framework of operational excellence in this endeavor it will enable them to demonstrate measurable value to their organizations. The work of this group has only just begun but this initial executive summary provides some evidence of the value the members of the group have thus far uncovered. Tier 1 Leaders™: Log-in to instantly receive your copy.
Click to download PDF file
984KB
   Defining the Total Cost of Security: Programs and Services Survey Showing Interesting Security Program Results This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
Selected preliminary analysis from our ground breaking research initiative is shown below. This represents only a small portion of the information being collected. You can expect much more in-depth analysis once the data collection phase of the process has concluded.
 
   Driving Excellence in Enterprise Security  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
This paper provides a starting place for security leaders who are interested in operational excellence or are considering applying it within their programs. It includes: Range of approaches gathered from discussions with a number of Tier 1 Leaders™; insight into how to achieve a critical baseline assessment of security’s value; potential measures of excellence in security programs; and a template to help investigate and identify initial targets for application of operational excellence.
 
   Managing and Defending a Security Budget - Laying a Foundation This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
Don’t be unprepared for a change that could dramatically affect Security’s budget. This article provides valuable insight for corporate security leaders on how to strategically address budgetary issues.
 
   Security Barometer Results: Are Security Practitioners Using Twitter for Business? This is Security Executive Council material  
Twitter apparently is being used by some people but we wanted to know if risk management practitioners were using twitter for business purposes. We are sharing some good feedback that might be of interest to you as you consider if and how Twitter might play a role in your risk management programs.
 
   Security Barometer Results: If You Had Three Wishes This is Security Executive Council material  
If you could have anything you wanted for your risk management program what would it be? In this quick poll we wanted to find out what elements would add the most value to security leaders and their teams.
 
   Security Barometer Results: Where do you go for information about your day-to-day operational needs? This is Security Executive Council material  
These results include the top eight resources sought out by risk management practitioners as well as examples of the type of information being requested.
 
   The Roadmap for Security Leadership Success Interviews, Practice #5 - Focus on Leadership Issues This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Francis D'Addario, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
Kathleen "K2" Kotwica, EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist for the Security Executive Council (SEC), interviews Francis D'Addario, SEC Emeritus Faculty and former CSO of Starbucks Coffee. The discussion delves into one of the 10 Roadmap for Success practices - the importance of focusing on leadership issues.
 
   The Roadmap for Security Leadership Success Interviews, Practice #9 - Recognize your organization is different from any other, even from peer companies This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Richard Lefler, Security Executive Council Executive Board of Advisors and Dean of Emeritus Faculty
Kathleen "K2" Kotwica, EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist for the Security Executive Council (SEC), interviews Richard Lefler, SEC Emeritus Faculty and former Vice President of Worldwide Security for American Express, on one of the 10 Roadmap for Success practices - the importance of recognizing each organization is different from any other and how this affects how the security leader should develop his or her risk mitigation program.
 
   What is in Security's Strategic Plan This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
The importance of having an effective strategic plan or equivalent is universally accepted. Identifying the goals for the Security function and developing a plan to achieve those goals is necessary to define priorities and most importantly provides an opportunity to ensure alignment with business objectives. This Security Barometer shows the results of an investigation into Security’s strategic planning process including what is going into the strategic plans and what the ultimate purpose of the plans are.
 
   Where Does All the Time Go? This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
In this Security Barometer we are investigating where security and risk management practitioners are spending their time. How do the results shown below compare to your own time management practice?
 

Presentation Materials

   Aligning Security Services with Business Objectives, 1st Edition This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Richard Lefler, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
Aligning Security Services with Business Objectives presents the ways in which security practitioners and executives can convey the value of security services to business leaders using measures and metrics. This 42-minute proven practices presentation also addresses how to develop and manage security programs that enhance profitability and the company’s ability to reduce shrinkage and loss.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Proven Practice presentations were created to be guidelines or training tools. This version is an Adobe file but you may contact us at contact@secleader.com for an online version with audio included from the subject matter expert.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Building Your Program This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
Demonstrating to senior management that you have a vision for what needs to be done, why and with what resources is an essential first step in gaining their confidence and buy-in for your plans. This diagram is a representation of the steps in the business case assessment and building process. It is an example of the many proven strategic initiatives included in the book, Adding Business Value by Managing Security Risks, from the Security Executive Council.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
    SEC Security State of the Industry: Is Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Enough? Security's Opportunity This is Security Executive Council material  
This SEC State of the Industry briefing covered topics such as why enterprise risk management fails; proven successful alternatives to the common enterprise risk assessment; the prevalence of cross-functional risk committees; why an operational risk council is beneficial to Security and the Organization; elements that make up an effective cross-functional risk council.
Click to download PDF file
1MB
   

Strategic Plan Presentation This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
This presentation describes a reliable process for creating a security strategic plan that resonates with senior management. It steps though how the security program is aligned with the business side.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   

The Strategic Landscape  This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
Is your program capable of being modified effectively when sudden changes in the economy, business direction or risks occur? Or is your strategy to provide the same services or programs regardless of changes in the strategic landscape? Results of SEC research show the best run programs are designed to respond and change quickly, in order to keep security services and associated costs aligned to the greatest degree possible. This presentation contains infographics that can be used to show how your program remains in alignment, despite sudden changes, to stakeholders.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   

Unified Risk Oversight Strategy This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
You can't determine the sources of risk or which risks to mitigate, transfer, avoid or accept unless you have a clear, enterprise-wide view of the risks that are present. The Security Executive Council calls this concept Unified Risk Oversight. This presentation contains a series of infographics that can be used to show the value of an enterprise-wide Unified Risk Oversight strategy to stakeholders. It also includes security's contribution and unavoidable residual risk concept.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only

Books/Guidelines/Manuals

   From One Winning Career to the Next This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: J. David Quilter, Security Executive Council Faculty
This book is for those that desire to transition from a government and/or military service career to the corporate world and become a business focused security leader. Author J. David Quilter's leadership experience spans decades of contributions in both the public and private sectors. This book focuses on the leadership skills the next generation of security leader needs to have a positive impact for any business or organization. For more, listen to a podcast from the author.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Log-in to obtain your copy.
OTHER VISITORS: Click the title to order this SEC resource.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Influencing Enterprise Risk Mitigation, 2nd Edition This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Francis D’Addario, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
In Influencing Enterprise Risk Mitigation, author Francis J. D’Addario draws on his many years of impressive security experience to describe business risk prevention and mitigation strategies. In this book, the author discusses the psychology of security, the geography of risk, and baseline identity authentication and access control measures. He also talks through the steps for making security a priority for the business, estimating return on investment for security services, and leveraging data to learn from the mistakes and successes of those who came before us.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Log-in to obtain your copy.
OTHER VISITORS: Click the title to order this SEC resource.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Measures and Metrics in Corporate Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
The revised second edition of Measures and Metrics in Corporate Security is an indispensable guide to creating and managing a security metrics program. This book shows how to improve security’s bottom line and add value to the business. It provides a variety of organizational measurements, concepts, metrics, indicators and other criteria that may be employed to structure measures and metrics program models appropriate to the reader’s specific operations and corporate sensitivities.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Log-in to obtain your copy.
OTHER VISITORS: Click the title to order this SEC resource.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Not a Moment to Lose…Influencing Global Security One Community at a Time This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Francis D’Addario, Security Executive Council CSO Emeritus
This book was developed as an influencing tool. It is also a timely call to action following the “reversal of fortune” witnessed by the last decade of manmade and natural disaster mitigation shortfalls. This is a resource that enables risk mitigation professionals and their team to connect their mission to the values of family, community, and organization. It is a people-centric guide based on the author's experiences in locally relevant, all-hazards risk preparedness, board-level risk mitigation and return on investment. TIER 1 LEADERS: To obtain your complimentary copy send an e-mail to contact@secleader.com.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
   

Personal Security Guidelines This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
Creating guidelines for dealing effectively with security risks involves a considerable amount of work and cost. The Security Executive Council’s goal in providing this guideline is to offer a template for you to use to start filling in the pieces of prevention strategies that work for your organization. TIER 1 LEADERS: To obtain your complimentary copy send an e-mail to contact@secleader.com.
 
   

Physical Security Guidelines This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
Creating guidelines for dealing effectively with security risks involves a considerable amount of work and cost. The Security Executive Council’s goal in providing this guideline is to offer a template for you to use to start filling in the pieces of prevention strategies that work for your organization. TIER 1 LEADERS: To obtain your complimentary copy send an e-mail to contact@secleader.com.
 
   Physical Security Strategy and Process Playbook This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: John Kingsley-Hefty, Contributing Editor, Security Executive Council Subject Matter Expert
The Physical Security Strategy and Process Playbook is a concise yet comprehensive treatment of physical security management in the business context. It can be used as an educational tool, help a security manager define security requirements, and serve as a reference for future planning.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Log-in to obtain your copy.
OTHER VISITORS: Click the title to order this SEC resource.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   

Searches and Inspections Guidelines This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
Creating guidelines for dealing effectively with security risks involves a considerable amount of work and cost. The Security Executive Council’s goal in providing this guideline is to offer a template for you to use to start filling in the pieces of prevention strategies that work for your organization. TIER 1 LEADERS: To obtain your complimentary copy send an e-mail to contact@secleader.com.
 
   Security Leader Insights for Business Continuity This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Phil Hopkins, Contributing Editor, Vice President of Global Security, Western Union Financial Services
In Security Leader Insights for Business Continuity, we have tapped some of the industry’s most distinguished security professionals for their opinions and expertise.3 This collection of timeless best practices is a quick and effective way to bring staff and/or contractors up to speed on topics related to crisis management, business resiliency, public-private partnerships, brand protection, and more. The short, straight-to-the-point chapters provide the reader with an easily accessible overview of current issues in information protection.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Log-in to obtain your copy.
OTHER VISITORS: Click the title to order this SEC resource.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Security Leader Insights for Effective Management This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Randy Harrison, Contributing Editor, Security Executive Council Tier 1 Leader
This book can be used as a quick and effective resource to bring your security staff up to speed on topics such as the characteristics of effective security leaders and programs, leading through difficult times, budget issues, and aligning security with business goals. Instead of re-inventing the wheel when faced with a new challenge, these proven practices and principles will allow you to execute with confidence knowing that your peers have done so with success.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Log-in to obtain your copy.
OTHER VISITORS: Click the title to order this SEC resource.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Security Leader Insights for Information Protection This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Fahy, Contributing Editor, Former Director of Corporate Security, Kraft Foods
This book can be used as a quick and effective resource to bring your security staff up to speed on security’s role in information protection. Instead of re-inventing the wheel when faced with a new challenge, these proven practices and principles will allow you to execute with confidence knowing that your peers have done so with success. It includes chapters on the collaboration between corporate and information security, emerging issues in information protection, and information protection regulations and standards.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Log-in to obtain your copy. OTHER VISITORS: Click the title to order this SEC resource
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Security Leader Insights for Success This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Dave Komendat, Contributing Editor, Security Executive Council Tier 1 Leader
This book can be used as a quick and effective resource to bring your security staff up to speed on leadership issues. Instead of re-inventing the wheel when faced with a new challenge, these proven practices and principles will allow you to execute with confidence knowing that your peers have done so with success.
TIER 1 LEADERS: Log-in to obtain your copy.
OTHER VISITORS: Click the title to order this SEC resource
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   Unified Risk Oversight for Security Operational Excellence This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
Senior management appears to waking up to the fact that non-financial risk is just as important to attend to as financial risk. Of course, most security leaders know this already – but the issue has been getting management to pay attention. This guide proposes a way to play a more visible role in enterprise risk management by way of operational risk management.
 

Articles

    "Management by Walking Around" Gets You Ready for a Crisis This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Rad Jones, SEC emeritus faculty
A chief security officer has to nurture, cultivate and respect relationships with internal and external partners who are essential to resolving a critical incident. One way to do so is to simply walk around.
Click to download PDF file
337KB
    2011 Annual Report for the Security Executive Council  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
This year's report covers activities, initiatives and resources in a three page condensed document. The information may be used to learn the kinds of support the SEC can offer you as well as a glimpse into what its members are tackling.
Click to download PDF file
745KB
    Are You Considering All Your Risk? This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Security executives have a choice: Be proactive by instituting Unified Risk Oversight to manage security risks, or wait until the Board requires you to do it and takes you to task for neglecting it in the past.
Click to download PDF file
315KB
    Balancing Board-Level Risk  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
The risk management failures of the financial community have left their mark on businesses of all types, through both the global economic crisis they ushered in and the resulting scrutiny of corporate risk oversight. The oversight role of the board of directors has been the target of proposed and implemented reforms including the Security and Exchange Commission’s enhanced proxy disclosure rules and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.
Click to download PDF file
557KB
    Comply Through Teamwork This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Kathleen Kotwica, Security Executive Council Staff
By coming together to resolve redundancies, you can show management that the company is as protected against regulatory risk as it can be. From the August 2007 issue of AC&SS magazine.
Click to download PDF file
321KB
    Confronting Global Risk  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Francis D’Addario, Security Executive Council CSO Emeritus
Collective knowledge, common purpose, and intelligent action are fundamental stepping stones for global risk mitigation. To that end, the Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC) convened stakeholders in Washington, DC, on November 18 and 19, 2009. Those gathered for the 24th annual briefing, hosted by co-chairs Jeffrey Culver, U.S. State Department director of diplomatic security service, and David Schrimp, 3M’s director of corporate security services, took away a valuable experience. 
Click to download PDF file
116KB
    Converging Risk Assessments This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Security Executive Council member John McClurg discusses how a converged risk assessment presents the interdependence between physical and cyber vulnerability. From the August 2008 issue of Network-Centric Security.
Click to download PDF file
315KB
    Coping with Changes to Company Leadership This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Security Executive Council Managing Director, and Greg Kane, Director of IT and Product Technology
Though we deal with risk every day, there is one risk that rarely makes it into our risk management plans – a change in organizational leadership. Whether the result of an internal structural shift, an external hiring decision or a merger/acquisition, a change in leadership and reporting can signal a challenging time for security. The new leader will have his or her own agenda, goals and view of what security does and what security’s role should be. If this does not mesh with your view or your existing strategies and operations, some meeting of the minds will be necessary.
Click to download PDF file
666KB
    Determining Operations Excellence in Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Emeritus Faculty, Security Executive Council
Since the 1980s, businesses have developed formal ways of gauging, monitoring and pursuing excellence in manufacturing and operations, including the disciplines of Six Sigma, Kaizen, Operations Excellence and Total Quality Management. Delivering excellence in products and services is a common-sense, accepted business objective. But what is “excellence” in security?
Click to download PDF file
325KB
    Don’t Forget the Culture Check  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Before implementing new security measures of any type, there are a lot of checks to make. When launching physical security technology, such as a new surveillance system, checks are made on hardware and software, policies and staffing requirements. And when you go live with new network security measures, checks are made on all the connections and rules, and with the support desk to make certain they’re ready for calls.
Click to download PDF file
102KB
    Four Strategies to Fill the Resource Gap  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Brad Brekke, Security Executive Council Staff
Over the last several decades, security professionals have watched risks increase due to factors such as globalization and technology. At the same time, shrinking budgets have limited access to security tools. Dealing with the resulting resource gap is a challenge for all security professionals today, but they can close this gap by focusing on four key levers: talent, technology, information and partnerships.
Click to download PDF file
121KB
    Getting the Message Out  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Sandy Sandquist, director of security for General Mills, and the Security Executive Council outline how to improve awareness programs by getting the right information to the right people, at the right time.
Click to download PDF file
571KB
    How Business and Risk Drivers Impact Mitigation Strategy  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Bob Hayes and Kathleen Kotwica, Security Executive Council Staff
As business changes, so does – or so should – security. The direction of business can have significant consequences for security, both internally – in terms of influence, funding and organizational structure – and externally – in new threats, new risk, new mitigation requirements.
Click to download PDF file
386KB
    Is the Knowledge Transfer Gap Hurting Security?  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Managing Director, Kathleen Kotwica, Security Executive Council
Adding business value. Getting a seat at the table. Running security like a business. Aligning security with the organization. These are the contents of the Holy Grail of security leadership. Everybody talks about them. Everybody wants them. But most security leaders view them as the stuff of legend – great for motivation, but unattainable in reality.
Click to download PDF file
226KB
    Leadership Move Three: Eliminate Fear and Comfort  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Derrick Wright, Security Executive Council Staff
A lean culture requires action, experimentation and new thinking. These transformational activities inevitably involve some level of risk. The culture at many organizations — even those that are considered innovative and risk-takers to the business community — are risk-averse internally. Since lean is best learned by doing, a lean leader must create the right environment to encourage and support experimentation. The fear associated with such activities must be eliminated, as well as the comfort that exists in maintaining the status quo.
Click to download PDF file
326KB
    Leading Up  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
How do you measure leadership success? Certainly, you can look down the chain and see whether your function and your team are accomplishing their objectives. You can usually tell if your staff is motivated and if they’re eager to follow you. But strong leadership isn’t just about how you relate to the people below you on the reporting ladder. It’s also about how you relate to those above.
Click to download PDF file
246KB
    Lean Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Ray Bernard, Security Executive Council Subject Matter Expert Faculty; Lynn Mattice; Derrick Wright, Security Executive Council Tier 1 Leader
Lean principles contain perspectives and tools that can be of tremendous use in increasing the value that security managers and executives provide to their organizations. From the July 2008 issue of ST&D magazine.
Click to download PDF file
337KB
    Like Risk, Security Leadership Success Is a Moving Target  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Managing Director, Kathleen Kotwica, Security Executive Council
Since the Security Executive Council launched six years ago, it and its research arm, the Security Leadership Research Institute (SLRI), have studied the shifting shape of the security profession and its drivers. Through in-depth, ongoing research, development of the Collective Knowledge™ process, and trend tracking, we have learned much about the changes that have affected security, as well as the personal and external factors that help determine leadership success.
Click to download PDF file
402KB
   Managing Enterprise-Wide Board Risk  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
A briefing on the Council's Board Level Risk Categories & Security Program Elements research and concept graphic. This type of information can be used to show senior management how security fits into the organization's overall risk management program.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
    Managing Expectations in a Changing World This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Problem identified and communicated, plan created, funds provided, problem resolved. This is the lifecycle senior business leaders often expect – and prefer – organizational challenges to have. It’s the way decisions are made and issues addressed for many functions of the business. Unfortunately, this leads senior management to expect a similar lifecycle of security-related challenges: 1) Security apprises management of threats and vulnerabilities. 2) Management allocates funds to address them. 3) Problem solved.
Click to download PDF file
691KB
    Metrics for Success: Warning Signs of Security’s Decreasing Influence, Part III This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: George Campbell, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
The third of three columns examining warning signs that security is losing influence with management decision-makers. From the December 2008 issue of ST&D magazine.
Click to download PDF file
88KB
    No Size Fits All  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Corporate campus security is often considered a no-brainer. Some access control, some cameras, maybe some CPTED and a guard force. Some CSOs delegate it entirely to their directors and managers and focus instead on more complicated business issues. But corporate campus security is not one-size-fits-all. Campus size, location and demographics, as well as business sector, facility type and risk factors of nearby businesses and landmarks, are all integral parts of an effective and appropriate corporate campus security plan. Microsoft, for example, makes its home base on one of the world’s largest corporate campuses. With more than 130 buildings spread over more than 15 million square feet centered around Highway 520 in Redmond, Wash., Microsoft’s headquarters campus looks imposing on paper. In all this openness, Mike Howard, General Manager of Global Security, has carved out a role for security that honors the company’s creative, casual culture while protecting the people and assets that make up one of the most recognized brands in the world. “You may spend a day at Microsoft and not be aware of security guards,” Howard says, “but that doesn’t mean Security hasn’t noticed you."
Click to download PDF file
1MB
    Planning for Change  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
You have to create a strategic plan knowing that there’s a high likelihood it will change. Does that mean you shouldn’t plan? "Absolutely not,” says Mark Lex, Security Executive Council faculty member and former director of security for Abbott Labs. Over his career, Lex learned through hard-won experience that security strategic planning, done well, incorporates a balance of anticipation and response, detail and flexibility.
Click to download PDF file
196KB
    Resilience Requires Intelligent Preparedness  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Francis D’Addario, Security Executive Council CSO Emeritus
Read an excerpt from the new book, Not a Moment to Lose: Influencing Global Security One Community at a Time, by Francis D’Addario, which will be available through the Security Executive Council this fall.
Click to download PDF file
318KB
   Retail Security: Adapting to innovation This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Dean Correia, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
Dean Correa, retail security expert, talks about the changing face of the market and how different retailers – in terms of size, goods sold, and so on - face different security threats.
 
   Risk at High Velocity  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
We have argued that the next generation of security leaders will be challenged more than previous leaders to run their function as a business; they will be expected to align with the organization and build value through security. As they work toward these goals, they will also be faced with new risks, some of which have the potential to escalate at a stunning pace.
 
    Running Security Like a Business This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
The next generation of security leaders will be challenged in ways previous generations have not. They will be asked to manage and monitor more risks and to identify and address new risks, including those created by drastic shifts in business operation and philosophy. They will have to do this more quickly, with fewer resources in many cases, and they will be expected to think and strategize at a board of director’s level. 
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215KB
    Rx: Converge for Security Effectiveness This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: David Kent, Security Executive Council member
The biotechnology industry must break out of the silo mentality. From the June 2007 issue of AC&SS magazine.
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310KB
    Security 2020: Identifying the Store of the Future This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Francis D'Addario, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
The Security Executive Council’s new Security 2020™ initiative is poised to influence continuous risk improvement through the next decade. The Store of the Future 2020 concept is extremely promising. The Council expects to announce advances on Store of the Future, a 10-year test bed of multiple technologies for retail security and business improvement, by fall of 2010. 2020 Store of the Future end-user test beds are presently in development for discount, fashion, healthcare, and quick-service food and beverage. This article was published in the January-February 2011 issue of LP Magazine.
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1MB
   

Security Alert - Enterprise Risk Management This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: George K. Campbell and Richard A. Lefler, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
When the economy’s down and budgets are stressed the threat level rises. This article addresses the importance of adopting an enterprise risk management perspective as a recession coping strategy. From the July/August 2009 issue of Harvard Business Review.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
    Security Executive Council Member Thought Leadership: A Unified View of Food Defense This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bill Ramsey, Security Executive Council Member
Council member Bill Ramsey of McCormick provides a more accurate definition of “Food Defense” and outlines a cross-functional approach for food companies to use in developing their Food Defense plans.
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57KB
    Security’s 2012 Accomplishments and 2013 To-Do List This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes and Kathleen Kotwica, Security Executive Council Staff
At the New Year we find ourselves reflecting on who we are as an industry, what we’re doing and where we hope to be. Our ongoing research of security-related issues has shed light on some remarkable changes in the security industry in the last ten years, many of which are driven by technology advances and shifts in the business environment.
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722KB
    Seven Ways to Maximize Value to the Corporation  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Williams Phillips, Security Executive Council Staff
Today’s corporations face a rapidly changing business climate, including a need to deal with a constantly shifting collection of risks. Remaining competitive and profitable requires a contemporary company – including the security function – to identify new methods to contribute to the organization’s success. For security professionals, this may mean acting on opportunities beyond traditional security functions and processes to find new ways to maximize security effectiveness, especially as they relate to cross-functional areas and activities that often overlap with other departments. A number of corporations and their security groups have benefited from this strategy; for others, this may serve as a beginning point.
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126KB
    Solutions Snapshot: Building a case for your security project  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council Staff
Four security professionals offer advice for putting together your next security project.
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189KB
    Solutions Snapshot: How do you define the cost of security?  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council Staff
Four security professionals discuss techniques for determining security budgets in a world without benchmarks.
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213KB
    Solutions Snapshot: How might I respond to a Web-based incident that causes significant brand damage?  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council Staff
Four security professionals discuss techniques for coping with internet crises that can dramatically damage a brand's reputation.
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261KB
    Solutions Snapshot: Moving Projects Forward While Cutting Costs This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council Staff
Four security professionals offer solutions for innovative ways to fund your security programs. From the March 2009 issue of Security Technology Executive.
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248KB
   Strategic Planning: Program Life Cycle This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Security Executive Council
An abbreviated portion of the Security Executive Council's (SEC) strategic planning process. It lists the steps to take to build your corporate security strategic plan.
 
    The Forces of Change  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Kathleen Kotwica, Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Security is changing in ways that will transform the industry. The SEC is developing tools to assist in tracking these trends. Security professionals can use the SEC guide as a resource to prepare themselves for upcoming global challenges with everything from security for telecommuters to offshore outsourcing. From the April 2008 issue of Security magazine.
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199KB
    The Real Impact of the Downturn This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Kathleen Kotwica, Security Executive Council Staff
Business leaders around the world are struggling to determine exactly how the global economic downturn will impact their operations and profitability. Among security leadership specifically, one oft-asked question is whether budgets are being decreased, and if so, how to tighten protection while tightening the belt. The Security Executive Council conducted a survey through the month of January to find out how some security leaders are answering these and other questions. More than 250 qualified security practitioners responded.
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268KB
    The Workplace Violence Epidemic  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
The challenges of securing employees, assets, clients and facilities can be difficult to meet in any environment; however, few organizations must contend with the level of daily turbulence and pressure that hospitals do. Changes due to federal health reform, compliance with data protection laws and employee safety directives, shifts in demographics and service philosophy, and increasing crime must all be addressed without inhibiting public access, reducing the speed of service, or enhancing patient discomfort and stress.
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344KB
    There's Value in Integrated Security This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
SEC member Mike Howard describes how Microsoft integrated and upgraded its three Global Security Operations Centers with built-in interoperability and redundancy.
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321KB
    Using Test Sites to Decrease Incidents and Increase Buy-in This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
One of the many difficult tasks in security leadership is showing senior management and other business leaders exactly how, where, and how much security investments positively impact the bottom line (assuming, that is, that security’s impact is positive).
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627KB
    When the Unpredictable Occurs This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Marleah Blades, Security Executive Council Staff
Historically, there has been a perception that security leaders are less than comfortable with unpredictability. If that’s the case, it’s understandable. After all, for many of these individuals, part of the job is knowing the future – preparing for every contingency and knowing when and how each event is likely to happen. They’re also often penalized by management for not predicting or preparing for everything.
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625KB

Forums

   Faculty Advisor: 20 Minutes with the Board This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Kenneth Kasten, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
I have been asked to make a presentation to my company’s Board of Directors. Any words of advice? Read Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty, Kenneth Kasten's, response to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Developing a Security Strategic Plan This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Mark S. Lex, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
I have recently been put in charge of defining the direction that security will take going forward within our company. Our group has already identified a department vision and mission. Can you give me some pointers on developing a strategic plan and communicating it to management in a manner that shows the value that it will bring to the company?
 
   Faculty Advisor: Evaluating Your Company’s Business Ethics Hotline (Whistleblower) Process  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Kenneth Kasten, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
I’m part of a team that is evaluating our company’s business ethics hotline (whistleblower) process. We are trying to decide if we should manage the process ourselves or hire a third party. What should we consider as part of our due diligence and decision? See Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty, Kenneth Kasten's answer.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Getting Beyond Guards and Gates  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Ken Kasten, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
My security team and I have so much to offer our company, but I can’t seem to get my management to give me the opportunity to show what we can bring to the table. Any ideas or advice on how to advance my security program beyond “guards and gates?” Read SEC Emeritus Faculty, Ken Kasten's, response to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Getting to Know the New Boss This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Managing Director, Security Executive Council
It has been announced that security will report to a new boss within a month. Although this is an internal promotion, I have not worked closely with this person in the past. My relationship with my previous boss was excellent. Can you recommend some successful strategies for getting my new executive management to be supportive of the security function? Read Security Executive Council Managing Director, Bob Hayes' answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Global Brand Integrity This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Richard Post, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
What does it really cost when you have a product attack? See Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty, Richard Post's, answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Helping Management Understand the Value of Your Security Organization This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Richard Lefler, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
I have been in charge of security for only a few years after leaving government and have no idea how to proceed in developing and presenting a plan to management. What are some of the specific areas that I should highlight to emphasize the importance of security’s role?
 
   Faculty Advisor: Holding Contractors Accountable This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Peter Cheviot, Security Executive Council Faculty Emeritus
Our Supply Chain relies on many third party contracted suppliers to provide their transportation services for our products and goods. How can we hold the suppliers accountable for meeting our security expectations? Read Security Executive Council Faculty Emeritus, Peter Cheviot's answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Improving the Security Culture Within Your Organization This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Peter Cheviot, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty Member
As a Manager of Security I am finding it difficult to influence others in my organization to participate or support the security programs. Are there effective processes that can be taken to change this? Read SEC faculty member Peter Cheviot's answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Making the Case for Capital Funding This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Kenneth Kasten, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
I need to obtain a large sum of funding for a security capital project. What advice can you offer to help improve my case when submitting the request? See Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty member, Kenneth Kasten's, answer.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Mitigating Security Related 10-K Risks This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Mark Lex, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty Member
My Board of Directors is asking what the security department is doing to mitigate security-related risks outlined in our 10-K report. How do I respond? See Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty, Mark Lex's, response.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Reestablishing Security as a Critical Partner within the Organization  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Security Executive Council Managing Director and Kathleen Kotwica, EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist, Security Executive Council
I have been on the job for several years and I sense senior management is not as on board with security as when I started. For example, there was management reorganization and I report to someone who is at a lower level than who I was reporting to before. There have been committees formed that I thought I should sit on and I was not invited. Should I be worried? Read Bob Hayes and Kathleen Kotwica's answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Security’s Failure to Communicate Value This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: J. David Quilter, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
Like many of my peers, I struggle with the issue of how to effectively demonstrate the bottom-line value that security’s efforts bring to the business. Thoughts?

See Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty member, J. David Quilter's, response to this question.

 
   Faculty Advisor: Stalemates in Security  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Kathleen Kotwica, Ph.D., EVP and Chief Knowledge Strategist and Bob Hayes, Managing Director, Security Executive Council
Security has made strides in the last ten years or so but I don’t think we are valued as much as we should be by the rest of the organization. What do you think we still need to do? Read Kathleen Kotwica and Bob Hayes' response to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: The Next Generation Security Leader This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Francis D
I’ve been at a manager level for a while now and I want to get to the next level. My boss is great but she is busy and doesn’t have time to coach me. What’s my best plan of attack? Read Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty member, Francis D'Addario's answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: The Pros and Cons of Managing a Consolidated Security Budget This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Stephen Baker, Security Executive Council Practitioner Faculty
I may have an opportunity to consolidate security costs for our site locations and international regions into one single budget for which I would have oversight. What are the pros and cons of doing this and, in your opinion, should I? Read Security Executive Council's Practitioner Faculty member, Stephen Baker's answer to this question.
 
   Faculty Advisor: Time Utilization and Staffing Capacity Analysis This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Security Executive Council Managing Director
My company is in the midst of a reduction in force (RIF) and security is one of many areas being required to provide senior management with an analysis of time, cost of services and programs and staff utilization. What is the most effective way to approach this exercise, keeping in mind that the goal is to maintain our current level of full-time equivalents (FTEs)? Read Bob Hayes' answer to this question.
 
   

Knowledge Exchange: Consolidation of Security Function after a Merger or Acquisition This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
Tier 1 Leaders and faculty shared experiences and advice on the subject of security's role when pulling companies together during/after mergers and acquisitions. Content contributors offer advice in the following areas: Getting involved in the M&A process early, personnel mapping and staff functions, tracking metrics closely, examples of how to sustain the organization and help staff adjust, the role of senior leadership, process timetables and other high-level strategies.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   

Knowledge Exchange: Merger and Acquisition Due Diligence This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
Tier 1 Leaders and faculty shared experiences and advice on what the range of the role in security doing due diligence prior to an acquisition or merger (M&A) is and about the process of converging/assimilating security functions during/after M&As.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
   

Knowledge Exchange: Unified Risk Oversight™ This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
Tier 1 Leaders and faculty shared experiences and advice on the benefits of having a Unified Risk Oversight™ team.
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only
Resource is for Tier One Leaders only

Multimedia

   Applying corporate security principles to faith-based organizations  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Mark Lex, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
Mark Lex discusses his role with the SEC and its new initiative with faith-based organizations. (Recorded at The Great Conversation in Seattle, Wash., March 4 &5, 2013)
 
   Developing Next Generation Security Leaders  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Francis D'Addario, Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty
Former Starbucks CSO and Security Executive Council Emeritus Faculty Member Francis D’Addario discusses the SEC’s Next Generation Security Leader Program and the characteristics up and coming security executives need to have to be successful in today’s career landscape. (Recorded at The Great Conversation in Seattle, Wash., March 4 &5, 2013)
 
   Shaping the Future of Security Leadership This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes, Managing Director, Security Executive Council
Bob Hayes, founder and managing director of the Security Executive Council, discusses the genesis of the organization's Next Generation Security Leader program and how it will provide a quality educational foundation for future security executives. (Recorded at The Great Conversation in Seattle, Wash., March 4 &5, 2013) 
 
   

Take Five: Resources your Peers are Using to Enhance Their Programs (and Careers) This is Security Executive Council material  

Created By: Security Executive Council
This presentation describes five of the Security Executive Council’s more popular resources. Covered are: Understanding the relationship between your company’s strategic business objectives and your security programs; how to best educate senior management (or new leadership) on program status or future direction; showing the Board and senior management security’s contribution in addressing Board-level risk concerns; measuring security program value; and staying on top of emerging trends.
     Click here to view a short video describing this resource in more detail.
   Thought Leader Insight on the State of the Industry  This is Security Executive Council material  
Created By: Bob Hayes
In March 2011 ASG held the Great Conversation. Over three hundred industry leaders attended the event to join in an interactive discussion around the state of the risk management industry. This recording from the event provides leading insight from Bob Hayes into what risk managers must focus on as the industry goes through this period of extraordinary transformation.
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35MB